military books by servicemembers.

 

 

 

MILITARY BOOKS

Stephen Coonts

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Flight of the Intruder (Jake Grafton Novels)
Stephen Coonts  More Info

Final Flight
Stephen Coonts  More Info

Under Siege
Stephen Coonts  More Info

The INTRUDERS
Stephen Coonts  More Info

Fortunes of War
Stephen Coonts  More Info

The Assassin: A Novel
Stephen Coonts  More Info
The Minotaur
Stephen Coonts  More Info

The Traitor (Tommy Carmellini, Book 2)
Stephen Coonts  More Info
Saucer
Stephen Coonts  More Info
Saucer: The Conquest
Stephen Coonts  More Info
The Cannibal Queen An Aerial Odyssey Across America
Coonts Stephen  More Info

Hong Kong: A Jake Grafton Novel
Stephen Coonts  More Info
Cuba (Jake Grafton Novels)
Stephen Coonts  More Info

Liberty: A Jake Grafton Novel (Jake Grafton Novels)
Stephen Coonts  More Info
America: A Jake Grafton Novel (Jake Grafton Novels)
Stephen Coonts  More Info

Liars & Thieves: A Novel
Stephen Coonts  More Info

War in the Air : True Accounts of the 20th Century's Most Dramatic Air Battles-By the Men Who Fought Them
Stephen Coonts  More Info

Victory, Vol. 1 (Victory)
Stephen Coonts  More Info

The Red Horseman
Stephen Coonts  More Info

Stephen Coonts' Deep Black: Conspiracy (Deep Black)
Stephen Coonts  More Info
Stephen Coonts' Deep Black: Jihad (Deep Black)
Stephen Coonts  More Info

Stephen Coonts' Deep Black: Payback (Deep Black)
Stephen Coonts  More Info
Deep Black Dark Zone (Deep Black)
Stephen Coonts  More Info
Stephen Coonts' Deep Black Biowar (Deep Black)
Stephen Coonts  More Info
Stephen Coonts' Deep Black: Arctic Gold (Deep Black)
Stephen Coonts  More Info

Publisher’s Weekly said of Liberty: A Jake Grafton Novel, “Coonts's latest gripping espionage thriller (after America, Hong Kong and Cuba) continues the adventures of Adm. Jack Grafton as he pursues major malefactors. This time, a rogue Russian general has sold nuclear warheads to a Mideastern anti-American terrorist best known for "hacking some tourists to death with a machete" in Egypt. Grafton must identify and locate the terrorist and his cronies before he detonates the weapons in the U.S. The action moves from central Russia and Suez to the American east coast. Readers familiar with the series know that while Grafton's methods trample on the law, the FBI and, especially, the CIA, he will be supported by persons at the highest level of government. Coonts's naval background and his legal education bring considerable authority to the story, and the narrative is loaded with detailed information about terrorist networks, modern weaponry and international intrigue. The plot is so intricate and involves so many characters that readers might lose track of who's who, though Coonts delineates the major players skillfully. The best character is a computer hacker whom Grafton gets released from prison so that she can invade the databases of law enforcement agencies in Washington. The action is slam-bang, and shifts in point of view accelerate the tension. The climax, played out in the recently renovated interior of the Statue of Liberty, is made for the movies. By the novel's end, Grafton is so detested by law enforcement that the only thing for him to do is retire. Readers will hope it's only temporary.”

 

AudioFile said of The Traitor, “Tommy Carmellini, former cat burglar, is tied to the straight and narrow by a simple commitment to the CIA: Serve or go to jail. Carmellini is assigned to Paris, where he works with his old boss. Their job is to find the connection between the director of the French intelligence service and his secret Al Qaeda agent. Dennis Boutsikaris packs his presentation with a dazzling variety of accents and characters of both genders. However, he is at his best as Carmellini. Boutsikaris provides a unique vocal identity with an expression and tempo that match Tommy's wiseacre attitude. With just a little imagination, listeners get the feeling they are sharing a beer with Carmellini while he tells his fascinating story. It doesn't get much better than this.”

Stephen Coonts majored in political science at West Virginia University, graduating in 1968 with an A.B. degree. Upon graduation he was commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Navy and began flight training in Pensacola, Florida.

 

Stephen Coonts received his Navy wings in August, 1969. After completion of fleet replacement training in the A-6 Intruder aircraft, Mr. Coonts reported to Attack Squadron 196 at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. He made two combat cruises aboard USS Enterprise during the final years of the Vietnam War as a member of this squadron. After the war he served as a flight instructor on A-6 aircraft for two years, then did a tour as an assistant catapult and arresting gear officer aboard USS Nimitz. He left active duty in 1977 and moved to Colorado. After short stints as a taxi driver and police officer, he entered the University of Colorado School of Law in the fall of 1977.

 

Stephen Coonts received his law degree in December, 1979, and moved to West Virginia to practice. He returned to Colorado in 1981 as a staff attorney specializing in oil and gas law for a large independent oil company.  Stephen Coonts is the author of Flight of the Intruder; Final Flight; Under Siege; The Intruders; Fortunes of War; The Assassin: A Novel; The Minotaur; The Traitor; Saucer; Saucer: The Conquest; The Cannibal Queen An Aerial Odyssey Across America; Garden of Eden; Hong Kong: A Jake Grafton Novel; Cuba: A Jake Grafton Novel; Liberty: A Jake Grafton Novel; America: A Jake Grafton Novel; Liars and Thieves; War in the Air; Victory; and, Red Horseman.

 

Stephen Coonts is also the co-author of Deep Black: Arctic Gold; Deep Black: Conspiracy; Deep Black: Payback; Deep Black: Jihad; Deep Black Biowar; and, Deep Black: Dark Zone.

Publisher’s Weekly said of Flight of the Intruder, “With this well-crafted first novel, the publishers of The Hunt for Red October again demonstrate a sure eye for picking winners in the thriller genre. Jake Grafton is an A-6 Intruder pilot during the Vietnam War who flies his bomber on sorties past enemy flak and SAM missiles, and then must maneuver his plane, often at night, onto the relatively small deck of an aircraft carrier. Former Navy flyer Coonts gives an excellent sense of the complexities of modern air raids and how nerve-wracking it is, even for the best airmen, to technically solve sudden problems over and over, knowing that even a twist of fatea peasant wildly firing a rifle from a fieldcould wipe out the crew. Grafton alternates between remorse over the fate of his unseen Vietnamese victims on the ground and a gung-ho "let's win this war" sentiment that lashes at both policymakers who select less-than-important targets for the dangerous missions and advocates for peace back in the States. The action, though, is realistically detailed and absorbing.”

 

According to the book description of Final Flight, “The most daring -- and deadly -- terrorist plot of all time is about to unfold aboard the supercarrier USS United States. If it succeeds, the balance of nuclear power will tilt in favor of a remorseless Arab leader. And it looks as if no one can stop it - except navy "jet jock" Jake Grafton. "Cag " Grafton is one helluva pilot. His F-14 Tomcat is one helluva plane. But some of Jake's crewmates have already vanished. A woman reporter who boarded the ship in Tangiers may not be who she claims to be. And Jake may have to disobey a direct order from the President himself for one spine-tingling, hair-raising Final Flight.”

 

The Library School Journal said of Under Siege, “Several story lines intertwine to produce a contemporary, fast-paced political thriller. Jake Grafton, seen in Coonts's previous three novels, returns as a staff member for the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He is joined by Jack Yocke, a Washington Post journalist, and Harrison R. Ford, an undercover agent, and the threesome assists the administration in rescuing Washington, D. C. from chaotic and horrifying circumstances that result when a Colombian drug lord and his gunmen arrive in this country for trial. While these events are unfolding, a hired assassin carries out an intricate plan to kill President Bush and several top officials. Coonts has readers' complete attention throughout this incredible, yet strangely believable, tale. There are many well-drawn characters in the sprawling story, and he does an excellent job of weaving together plot and participants.”

 

AudioFile said of The Assassin: A Novel, “Stephen Coonts returns with his most compelling novel to date. All the the elements of the espionage thriller are in place: angry terrorists, Russian dissidents, a captivating secret agent, and, yes, the mysterious woman he falls for, who may have connections with the enemy. Only a gifted performer could bring such an incredible story to life and, equally important, make it believable. Dennis Boutsikaris is the right man for the job. He provides realistic accents for the colorful characters that abound. Furthermore, he knows exactly when to ratchet up the tension and bring listeners to the edge of their seats. Ultimately, Boutsikaris makes the unbelievable seem like breaking news.

 

According to the book description of Deep Black: Conspiracy, “A Secret Service agent is dead, an apparent suicide. A presidential candidate narrowly escapes an assassin’s bullet. And Desk Three, a convert branch of the NSA, is searching for a chilling connection deep inside The Republic of Vietnam. Once, Charlie Dean was a Marine sniper in Quang Nam Province. Today he’s a Deep Black operator, returning to Vietnam to find the source of some threatening e-mails. Instead, he comes face to face with a man he had once hunted down…and thought he had killed.

 

Back in the U.S., Deep Black agent Lia DeFrancesca has uncovered the trail of a killer in Dean’s path. Now, with every asset, weapon, bug and high-tech magic wand Desk Three can wave, the agents enter a terrifying global race against time. Because ghosts of the past have risen to life…to strike a death blow into the heart of the U.S.A.”

 

Publisher’s Weekly said of Deep Black: Payback, “This master of the techno-thriller spins a bone-chilling worst-case scenario involving international spies, military heroics, conniving politicians, devious agencies, a hijacked nuclear sub, lethal computer hackers, currency speculators, maniac moguls and greedy mercenaries that rivals Clancy for fiction-as-realism and Cussler for spirited action. . . . [Coonts] never lets up with heart-racing jet/missile combat, suspenseful submarine maneuvers and doomsday scenarios that feel only too real, providing real food for thought in his dramatization of the missile-shield debate.”

 

AudioFile said of Deep Black: Jihad, “the white hats of the West square off against Al Qaeda. Deep Black operatives use an elaborate scheme to infiltrate Al Qaeda by planting a listening device inside a terrorist's skull. From an operations center called The Art Room, technicians track the target and direct the action of watcher teams. The chase is on to learn what the terrorist and Al Qaeda are planning and how it can be stopped. J. Charles presents JIHAD in his usual crisp, clear, well-paced style. Character differentiation is challenging with so many people involved in the operation. But Charles's solid efforts manage to bring energy to this otherwise run-of-the-mill thriller.”

 

Publishers Weekly said of Saucer, “A flight of fancy and a departure from Coonts's bestselling techno-thrillers (Flight of the Intruder, etc.) pits an eager young grad student against seasoned military, government and corporate raider types for control of an ancient flying saucer dug out of a sandstone outcrop in the Sahara. Rip Cantrell is acting as gofer for a seismic survey when a glint of metal in the sand catches his eye. Aided by archeologists from a nearby dig, he unearths the ship, but the U.S. Air Force UFO team shows up followed shortly by armed thugs sent by Australian mogul Roger Hedrick. When the Libyan army appears on the scene as well, Rip and test pilot Capt. Charlotte (Charley) Pine manage to hijack the controls of the saucer, evading all their pursuers and flying to the Missouri farm of Rip's Uncle Egg, "inventor, wizard, mechanic extraordinaire." Egg cues Charley and Rip to the saucer's advanced flight capabilities, and they make decoy runs to mask their real location. But Hedrick tracks them down, and Charley is forced by a Hedrick operative to fly the saucer to the mogul's Australian ranch. Rip heads Down Under with rescue in mind when the UFO team (previously in Libyan captivity) are set free and tell all on TV, forcing Hedrick to change plans. He puts the saucer up for sale to one lucky nation, but has a sinister plan that Charley vows to disrupt. The moves get more deadly as the bidding begins, and Rip comes on the scene for a predictably spectacular ending. More Cussler than Clancy, this cartoonish slice of escapism is also more hokey than suspenseful ("But saucers do exist. There one is!"); still, it's tough to put down.”

 

The School Library Journal said of Fortunes of War, “YA-A modern military thriller. U.S. Colonel Cassidy and Jiro Kimura, a Japanese fighter pilot, friends since they met at the Air Force Academy, find themselves on opposing sides of a highly charged political situation. Japanese radicals have taken over their country and hope to seize Siberian oil fields to help the failing Japanese economy. Sent to help the Russians, Cassidy and his team of American pilots try to avert a nuclear holocaust. Meanwhile, a Russian submarine inflicts damage on the Japanese coast. The stealthy events leading to the beheading of the Japanese emperor in the opening chapter grab readers' attention. Intense action and the use of short sentences and fragments heighten the dramatic urgency and speed the plot along. There are numerous military details; however, it is possible to skim through them and still get to know the characters and follow the story. This fast read is a good introduction to adult military novels for teens, who will also learn something of Japanese and Russian history from the cultural details woven into the story.”

 

Publisher’s Weekly said of America: A Jake Grafton Novel, “What could possibly go wrong if Congress manages to approve the ICBM missile defense shield being pushed by the White House? This master of the techno-thriller spins a bone-chilling worst-case scenario involving international spies, military heroics, conniving politicians, devious agencies, a hijacked nuclear sub, lethal computer hackers, currency speculators, maniac moguls and greedy mercenaries that rivals Clancy for fiction-as-realism and Cussler for spirited action. Rear Adm. Jake Grafton is shocked, as are his fellow Russian and European observers, when a satellite for the SuperAegis missile shield goes out of launch mode and is lost in seconds. Moments later, the state-of-the-art nuclear submarine America is hijacked on her maiden voyage. The sub is armed with Tomahawk missiles with "Flashlight" warheads capable of frying all unprotected electronics within miles of detonation, crippling target cities. Jake suspects Janos Ilin and his Russian bosses, and forms a shaky "alliance" to test Ilin while digging for info. Meanwhile, Tommy Carmellini, a convicted felon with a talent for burglary that got him "recruited" by the CIA, tumbles onto a dastardly agency plot and secretly cues Jake. When American Tomahawks launched on Washington paralyze the city the whole East Coast lapses into chaos, the dollar plunges, and Jake's team, led by streetsmart black marine Gen. "Flap" LeBeau, goes into overdrive. Perennial bestseller Coonts (Hong Kong; Flight of the Intruder) never lets up with heart-racing jet/missile combat, suspenseful submarine maneuvers and doomsday scenarios that feel only too real, providing real food for thought in his dramatization of the missile-shield debate.

 

Publishers Weekly said of The Minotaur, “Navy Captain Jake Grafton develops an aircraft known as the Minotaur using Stealth technology and deals with a Defense Department information leak in this techno-thriller. PW commented, "Coonts is most compelling when he focuses on the politics of design and procurement; his comparisons of Navy and Air Force procedures are admirably sharp-edged.”

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