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MILITARY BOOKS

Andrew C. A. Jampoler

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Captain Andrew C. A. Jampoler, USN (Ret.) is a retired naval aviator and former commanding officer of Patrol Squadron 19 and of Naval Air Station Moffett Field. Andrew C. A. Jampoler is the author of Adak: The Rescue of Alfa Foxtrot 586;  Sailors in the Holy Land: The 1848 American Expedition to the Dead Sea and the Search for Sodom and Gomorrah; and, The Last Lincoln Conspirator: John Surratt's Flight from the Gallows.

 

According to a reader of Adak: The Rescue of Alfa Foxtrot 586, “This is a riveting account of the horrific North Pacific ditching of P-3 Orion AF-586 (PD-2) in 1978. Thorough research and interviews bring the crew to life on the page. I could hardly put the book down, and read it in less than 2 days. A much better read than Shane Osborn's "Born to Fly”  Another reader said, “I read this very exciting account of the rescue of these flyers in two sittings. Capt. Jampoler brings the story to life by presenting, "Finding of Facts," from the official investigation and then tells us the details in a very readable way. Jampoler also brings humor into this heroic story. He explains that the Navy does not train flyers to use survival suits in freezing water because it is akin to "practice bleeding.”

 

According to a reader of Sailors in the Holy Land: The 1848 American Expedition to the Dead Sea and the Search for Sodom and Gomorrah, “The multi-month expedition undertaken by the U.S. Navy to the Holy Land and led by Lt. William F. Lynch in 1848 rates as one of the most exotic the service has ever undertaken, as written by Daniel Pipes. At a time when the navy consisted of only eleven thousand officers and men and in general stayed on well-worn routes, setting off to the Dead Sea, not for any military purpose but in search of Sodom and Gomorrah, ranks as a folly. But the mission had serious scientific purposes, was professionally executed, and provides to this day important information on the Jordan River and its associated lakes.”

 

According to the book description of The Last Lincoln Conspirator: John Surratt's Flight from the Gallows, “Despite all that has been written about the April 1865 assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, the story of John Surratt--the only conspirator who got away--remains untold and largely unknown. The capture and shooting of John Wilkes Booth twelve days after he shot Lincoln is a well-known and well-covered story. The fate of the eight other accomplices of Booth has also been widely written about. Four, including Surratt's mother, Mary, were convicted and hanged, and four were jailed. John Surratt alone managed to evade capture for twenty months and escape punishment once he was put on trial. In this tale of adventure and mystery, Andrew Jampoler tells what happened to that last conspirator, who after Booth's death became the most wanted man in America.

 

As the first full-length treatment of Surratt's escape, capture, and trial, the book provides fascinating details about his flight from New York, where he was on a Confederate spy mission scouting the huge Union prisoner of war camp in Elmira, through eastern Canada to a hideout in Liverpool, England, and on to France and the Papal States. His twenty-month flight, including nearly one year of enlisted service in the Papal Zouaves (the pope's army), is a remarkable adventure through mid-century Europe and locations unknown to most Americans of the time. Despite an uncontrollable tendency to babble to strangers about who he really was and what he had done, Surratt, frequently sheltered by sympathetic Roman Catholic priests, managed to stay at large during a flight that took him across three continents and over the Atlantic Ocean and half the Mediterranean Sea. Finally caught in Alexandria, Egypt, he was returned to Washington to stand trial in 1867.

 

Jampoler brings Surratt to life as he traces the wily young man's remarkable journey and the bitter legal proceedings against him that bizarrely led to his freedom. After his trial, Surratt lived out his life peacefully in Baltimore, marrying a relative of Francis Scott Key and dying at the age of seventy-two. The book's cast of characters includes a menagerie of the nineteenth century's most colorful personalities.”

 


Adak: The Rescue of Alfa Foxtrot 586
Andrew C. A. Jampoler  More Info

Sailors in the Holy Land: The 1848 American Expedition to the Dead Sea and the Search for Sodom and Gomorrah
Andrew C. A. Jampoler  More Info

The Last Lincoln Conspirator: John Surratt's Flight from the Gallows
Andrew C. A. Jampoler  More Info

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