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John J. Sullivan

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Colonel John J. Sullivan, USMC (ret.) was “designated a Naval Aviator in January 1968, he trained in the UH-1E helicopter at Marine Corps Auxiliary Air Field (MCAAF) Camp Pendleton, California.  May 1968, he was on his way to the Western Pacific and served as a helicopter gunship pilot with VMO-6 in the Republic of Vietnam.  First Lieutenant Sullivan flew over 1000 combat missions and was awarded three Distinguished Flying Crosses and the Purple Heart while operating from Quang Tri Combat Base in Northern I Corps.  Upon the completion of his thirteen-month combat tour, he was transferred to Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field Futema, Okinawa in May 1969. 

 

Following duty as a student at Amphibious Warfare School, Quantico, Virginia, he was accepted for jet aircraft transition to the F-4 “Phantom II” aircraft in 1973.  He was subsequently assigned to VMFA-312, Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS), Cherry Point, North Carolina.  He served as the Logistics Officer and later as the Aircraft Maintenance Officer while flying the F-4J.  The “Checkerboards” relocated to MCAS Beaufort, South Carolina, in August 1974.  Captain Sullivan was transferred to the Western Pacific in January 1976 and served as the Aircraft Maintenance Officer of VMFA-115, MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, while flying the F-4J.

 

In September 1983, Lieutenant Colonel Sullivan reported to the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air Warfare), Washington, DC, as the F/A-18, F-4, and RF-4 Program Coordinator and resource sponsor in the Aircraft Requirements Branch (OP-506).  He oversaw the Department of the Navy’s newest fighter/attack aircraft program, then its largest development and acquisition plan.  He received a gold star in lieu of a second Meritorious Service Medal for guiding the “Hornet” program through its initial fleet stand up and first successful aircraft carrier air wing deployment.

 

He reported to the Naval War College staff in July 1990 and was assigned as Professor of Management and Course Director of Policy Making and Implementation within the National Security Decision Making Department.  He retired from the Marine Corps in September 1994.”  Colonel John J. Sullivan is the author of Servant First! Leadership for the New Millennium.

 

One reader of Servant First! Leadership for the New Millennium said, “Early this morning in the locker room of my local YMCA, I had a recurring discussion with a friend and senior executive from an internationally recognized American bank. We discussed a subject of mutual interest to both of us--the need in our society to develop effective managers. In our opinion leaders may be born (to a degree) but managers are made (or more precisely, developed) over time. It takes great focus, patience, and courage to become an effective manager. John Sullivan's book give great insight into the secret of what it takes to become particular type of manager--one who can capably serve society through responsibly using the leadership qualities they possess.I have been a manager for a large corporation, taught undergraduate and graduate management courses, and been assigned responsibility for developing managers at a large federal agency. As a result of my interest in the subject I have read a number of books on the subject of servanthood, or stewardship, and--in my opinion--John Sullivan's book is the best. Why do I believe "Servant First" is a book that deserves to be read?

 

In the first half of his book, John builds a sound foundation by addressing the best of existing management theory. I have known John Sullivan for several years and he is in his element here. John has also been a manager and he has has also taught management for years. He knows the breadth, depth, and current state of management study--with at times its shortcomings and shallowness--and he is an excellent communicator. His balanced treatment of this initial section can probably only be truly measured for its scholarship by someone who has read widely in the field, but it does not take a scholar to understand and appreciate what John is writing about. He is clear, practical, and to the point. Then, in the second half of the book, John turns with great insight and enthusiasm to directly address his thesis. "One needs to start with the attitude of a servant if one is to successfully serve others, and the teachings of Jesus Christ provide some great insight into this task that should be understood--not ignored or disregarded." John is as capable in his Biblical scholarship as he is in the field of management study. This is no simplistic cookbook written for the amateur. In this short book, John has provided his reader with a very lucid, succinct summary of management thought taken from a distinctly Christian perspective.

 

John is consistently logical, and his book has an organization that neither presumes too much, nor bores the reader. By the time one finishes "Servant First," one has a good picture of both the challenges and contributions of a servant ethic that attempts to emulate the teachings of Jesus Christ. One doesn't have to be a Christian to learn important principles from this book, but if one is a Christian there is a special insight into this process of developing one's servanthood that can be gained because of one's experiences and difficulties in attempting to serve--with competence. I recommend it without reservation for the practitioner, the scholar, or the beginning student. I also recognize that it may have value for those working within churches. The experienced manager will fine that there is contained in this book a timeless, classical wisdom written with an understanding of the modern world of the twenty-first century. It is a passionate message that one can only hope will find root in contemporary soil.”


Servant First!
Xulon Press  More Info

According to the book description of Servant First! Leadership for the New Millennium, “Entering the new millennium, men and women across the globe are crying out for a new type of leadership.  The old command and control model is dead and the search for a new approach has begun. In Servant First! Leadership for the New Millennium, John Sullivan develops a practical leadership model based on a careful study of the teaching and practice of Jesus of Nazareth. 

 

This upside down leadership style puts the needs of followers above the needs of the leader; promotes teamwork, individual dignity and worth; and results in a synergy of purpose unachievable with the old leadership models.  Its application in today’s organizations creates an environment in which people freely choose to create, innovate and strive for excellence.

 

The book begins with a review of traditional leadership theories and contrasts them with servant leadership.  Drawing on the work of W. Edwards Deming, Robert Greenleaf, and others, Sullivan shows how each of these modern leadership approaches is molded by the servant-first style of Jesus.  The reader is left with a model for leading 21st century organizations that will unleash the creativity of people working together to achieve common objectives.

 

Entering the new millennium, men and women across the globe are crying out for a new type of leadership. The old command and control model is dead, and the search for a new approach has begun. In this book, Sullivan develops a practical leadership model based on a careful study of the teaching and practice of Jesus of Nazareth. This upside-down leadership style puts the needs of followers above those of the leader; promotes teamwork, individual dignity, and worth; and results in a synergy of purpose unachievable with the old leadership models. Its application in today’s organizations creates an environment in which people freely choose to create, innovate, and strive for excellence. The reader is left with a model for leading 21st-century organizations that will unleash the creativity of people working together to achieve common objectives.”

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