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MILITARY BOOKS

John D. Roche

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Major John D. Roche, USAF (ret) “served as a bomber pilot, had combat duty in the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and held a variety of administrative assignments. Subsequently, he worked for sixteen years as a claims adjudicator specialist for the Veterans Administration and as a veterans’ service officer for Pinellas County, Florida, where he was a tireless advocate for veterans and their families. Roche enjoyed one of the highest rates of wins on appeal in the state.”  John D. Roche is the author of Veterans’ PTSD Handbook: How to File and Collect on Claims for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder; The Veteran's Survival Guide: How to File and Collect on VA Claims; and, Claim Denied!: How to Appeal a VA Denial of Benefits.

 

According to the book description of The Veteran's Survival Guide: How to File and Collect on VA Claims, “Claim denied! All too often millions of veterans have received this response to their legitimate claims for Federal benefits. In most cases, writes Roche, the claimant didn't understand the procedures needed to meet the myriad requirements of the Department of Veterans Affairs. With appeals process requiring years to resolve disputes, veterans and their dependents are left confused and frustrated by the agency and a system that was created to serve them. The answer is to submit a well-grounded claim initially, which this book analyzes in detail. Written in an accessible self-help style, Roche's book should be required reading for any veteran or veteran's dependent who wishes to obtain their well-earned benefits and for those officials of veterans service organizations whose job it is to assist veterans with their claims.”

 

According to the book description of Claim Denied!: How to Appeal a VA Denial of Benefits, “The VA is not your loving Uncle Sam who opens his wallet and says, ‘Here you are, nephew—a $1,000 check per month for the rest of your life. That should take the pain out of your service injuries,’ ” writes John D. Roche. Far from it, he reveals. Though the Veterans Claims Assistance Act of 2000 requires Veterans Affairs to assist veterans in developing the foundation to support their claims, in reality if you rely on the VA to find and develop the evidence necessary to grant benefits then your claim is likely to be denied. Claim Denied! will help those veterans whose benefits have been denied correct the mistakes they made when they submitted their original claims. Appealing a VA decision is not an impossible feat, Roche says, but a veteran’s story must be presented in a well-organized and logical format, so any reviewing authority is able to understand the issues as they relate to the laws. This book explains in detail how to develop and present a successful appeal.”


Claim Denied!: How to Appeal a VA Denial of Benefits
John D. Roche  More Info

Veterans's PTSD Handbook: How to File and Collect on Claims for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
John D. Roche  More Info

The Veteran's Survival Guide: How to File and Collect on VA Claims, Second Edition
John D. Roche  More Info

According to the book description of  Veterans’ PTSD Handbook: How to File and Collect on Claims for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, “from the author of The Veteran’s Survival Guide, The Veteran’s PTSD Handbook addresses the obstacles that veterans face when filing for benefits related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One of the greatest obstacles, John Roche writes, is establishing a connection between a veteran’s service and PTSD. Because both combat stressors and noncombat stressors can cause PTSD and because of the difficulties in diagnosing the condition, filing a successful claim for benefits based on PTSD is difficult.

 

In the same accessible, self-help style used in The Veteran’s Survival Guide, Roche offers detailed instructions on how to prepare a well-grounded claim for veterans’ benefits relating to PTSD. He also discusses the four years he spent helping one veteran establish a “service connection” for his PTSD claim with Veterans Affairs. This book will be required reading for any veteran or veteran’s dependent who wishes to obtain his or her well-earned benefits and for those officials of veterans’ service organizations who assist veterans with their claims.”

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