MILITARY BOOKS

David P. Colley

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Decision at Strasbourg: Ike's Strategic Mistake to Halt the Sixth Army Group at the Rhine in 1944 (Ausa)
David P. Colley  More Info

Blood for Dignity: The Story of the First Integrated Combat Unit in the U.S. Army
David P. Colley  More Info

Safely Rest
David P. Colley  More Info

The Road to Victory: The Untold Story of World War II's Red Ball Express
David P. Colley  More Info

According to the book description of Safely Rest, “From 1945 to 1950, the United States returned 178,000 dead American servicemen back home and reburied another 80,000 in overseas cemeteries at their families' request. Never before had a nation returned so many of its fallen warriors from distant battlefields. But another 78,000 servicemen were still missing in action-their bodies never to be found-their families never to know the peace of closure.

 

Safely Rest recalls this virtually forgotten episode of WWII through the recollections of the survivors and the letters and histories of the dead themselves. It tells of those who struggled to absorb their loss and rebuild their lives-and of those who would never be able to move on.

 

Most memorably, it tells of Lt. Jesse D. "Red" Franks, Jr--first reported missing, then dead, then reported to be alive-and of his extraordinarily devoted father, who gave up everything to work as a missionary in war-torn Europe for years until he discovered what truly happened to his son.”

 

Jay Karamales, co-author of Against the Panzer: United States Infantry versus German Tanks, 1944-1945, said of The Road to Victory: The Untold Story of World War II's Red Ball Express, “The old adage says that amateurs talk tactics while professionals talk logistics. Yet there is a sad dearth ofbooks that examine World War II logistical operations in any detail. Colley's well-researched, well-written book helps fill that void and sets a standard for measuring the impact of supply considerations on combat operations. I was particularly impressed by the discussion of racism and its impact not only on the Red Ball but on the conduct of the war . . .In this sense, Colley's book . . .contribute(s) to the growing collection of works . . .on racism in American society and the armed forces in World War II.”

David P. Colley was born in San Francisco and raised in the U.S. and in Europe. He is a graduate of Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, and served in the Ordnance branch of the U.S. Army. After military service he became a journalist, first as a reporter and assistant city editor with the Trenton, N.J. Trentonian and later as a reporter with the Baltimore Evening Sun. During his journalism career he won numerous national and regional awards for excellence. David P. Colley is the author of Blood for Dignity: The Story of the First Integrated Combat Unit in the U.S. Army; Decision at Strasbourg: Ike's Strategic Mistake to Halt the Sixth Army Group at the Rhine in 1944; Safely Rest; and, The Road to Victory: The Untold Story of World War II's Red Ball Express.

 

LTC Edward G. Miller, US Army (Ret), said of Decision at Strasbourg: Ike's Strategic Mistake to Halt the Sixth Army Group at the Rhine in 1944, “This is an exceptionally well-crafted story of high level decisions under the pressures of war. Colley has written a great book that is easy to read, rich in detail and balanced in its coverage of controversial events whose impacts reverberate even today. Just when you think you've read everything on the US Army in WWII, think again. This welcome addition to the historian's bookshelf offers fresh analysis of famous personalities like Eisenhower and Bradley, and will introduce readers to others, like Jacob L. Devers, who deserve much more attention for their service. This book will fascinate anyone interested in untold stories of conflict and leadership.”

 

Booklist said of Blood for Dignity: The Story of the First Integrated Combat Unit in the U.S. Army, “General Eisenhower ordered the integration of U.S. combat divisions in Germany in 1945, providing an opportunity for black soldiers to exhibit bravery and loyalty and solidify the basis for their demands of dignity. Colley interviewed several veterans of K Company, 394th Regiment, the first black soldiers to be integrated with white troops since the American Revolution. The veterans recount memories of an intense combat environment--fighting alongside their white countrymen on battlegrounds and, at the same time, fighting the bias and negative perceptions of those same countrymen toward black soldiers. Their war experience proves to be exemplary, dispelling more than a century of stereotypes of blacks as cowardly and disloyal. However, along with the glory of their combat experience, the veterans recalled racial prejudice and hatred, starting with basic training in the Deep South. But the frontline held the greatest appeal as an arena for proving their bravery, loyalty, and expectations to be treated as equals in all aspects of American life.”

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